The two sides still work together, no matter how lateralized the brain can get, though. The pop psychology notion of a left brain and a right brain doesn’t capture their intimate working relationship. The left hemisphere specializes in picking out the sounds that form words and working out the syntax of the words, for example, but it does not have a monopoly on language processing. Tuning in to the slow rhythms of speech that carry intonation and stress, the right hemisphere is actually more sensitive to the emotional features of language. Another common misconception is that humans have the largest brains of any organism although the human brain is quite large in proportion to body size. The average adult has a brain weighing in at about three pounds and measuring up to about 15 centimeters in length. The largest animal brain belongs to that of a sperm whale, weighing in at a whopping 18 pounds! Another large-brained animal is the elephant, with an average brain size of around 11 pounds. But what about relative brain size in proportion to body size? Humans must certainly have the largest brains in comparison to their body size, right?

Other myths about the brain

 This notion is also a myth – once again. Surprisingly, one animal that holds the largest body-size to brain ratios is the shrew, with a brain making up about 10 percent of its body mass. Our primate lineage had a head start in evolving large brains, however, because most primates have brains that are larger than expected for their body size. The Encephalization Quotient is a measure of brain size relative to body size. The cat has an EQ of about 1, which is what is expected for its body size, while chimps have an EQ of 2.5 and humans nearly 7.5. Dolphins, no slouches when it comes to cognitive powers and complex social groups, have an EQ of more than 5, but rats and rabbits are way down on the scale at below 0.4. This is the opinion of Michael Balter. Traditional wisdom has long suggested that adults only have so many brain cells and that we never form new ones. Are they really gone for good once these cells are lost? Experts have discovered evidence that the human adult brain does indeed form new cells throughout life, even during old age in recent years. e process of forming new brain cells is known as neurogenesis and researchers have found that it happens in at least one important region of the brain called the hippocampus. Partly related to the myth that we never grow new neurons is the idea that drinking alcohol can lead to cell death in the brain. Drink too much or too often, some people might warn, and you'll lose precious brain cells that you can never get back. We've already learned that adults do indeed get new brain cells throughout life, but could drinking alcohol really kill brain cells?